Tater tots are the perfect snack: portable, easy to eat and super tasty. They’re especially loved in the toddler and school-aged crowd. But have you seen what’s in those ingredient lists? Luckily, you can make your own low-carb snack version, thanks to this cauliflower recipe. With only five ingredients that are baked instead of fried, you won’t believe how much better this version tastes.
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Looking for a new way to make healthy chips? Then you have to try these tomato chips. You’ll slice big, juicy tomatoes into thick slices and drizzle them with benefit-rich olive oil. After sprinkling them with Parmesan cheese and Italian seasonings, they’ll slow bake for several hours. The result is a tray full of low-carb snacks that are actually good for you!
This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.
If you are choosing to try a low carb diet, then traditional sugar is off the list. Of course, you may know by now that there are so many sweetener options that are low carb diet approved. So when you are feeling the need for sweet, you can easily reach for one of these! In fact, you can find many recipes for sweet, low carb treats below which we will talk about even more soon!

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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