What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.

In our new documentary, Digital Editor Robert Hicks speaks to three young men who all attempted to take their own lives. Here, they talk about what they were feeling when they believed there was no way out. How #depression grabbed them and wouldn't let go. They reflect on what's happened since, how they cope and, most importantly, how they are doing better.

Looking for a new way to make healthy chips? Then you have to try these tomato chips. You’ll slice big, juicy tomatoes into thick slices and drizzle them with benefit-rich olive oil. After sprinkling them with Parmesan cheese and Italian seasonings, they’ll slow bake for several hours. The result is a tray full of low-carb snacks that are actually good for you!
The first winner of the UK Cover Model search was 22-year-old Graeme Peacock,[4] who secured a sponsorship contract with supplement manufacturer Maximuscle. There was no contest in 2003, and in 2004 the contest went annual, with the second winner being Neil Laverty, now represented by Compton Model Agency. Winners for 2005 were Ollie Foster (United Kingdom) and Manuel Mera (Spain). In 2006, 21-year-old Mike Fawkes won the competition, in 2007 Chris Whitlow, in 2008 Kevin Goodwin, in 2009 29-year-old James Bayntun,[5] in 2010 Kirk Miller.[citation needed] Celebrities such as Jason Statham, Rusty Joiner, Ryan Reynolds, Josh Holloway, Marco Dapper, Gerard Butler, Vin Diesel, Joe Manganiello and Cristiano Ronaldo have appeared on the cover].[citation needed]
When you’re on a low-carb diet, noshing on nuts is all too common—and can get old pretty quickly. To spice things up a bit—literally—get your hands on Seapoint Farms’ wasabi-infused dry-roasted edamame snack packs. Besides having a satisfyingly crunchy texture and kick of heat, they pack 11 grams of soy protein and five grams of belly-filling fiber in each 100-calorie serving!
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.
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