How many times have you bought eggs, fully intending to boil them for the week ahead–and then just totally forgot? We know we’re guilty of this. These natural eggs are cooked, peeled and ready to eat whenever hunger strikes. Oh, and while you’re munching away, don’t discard the yolk. Thanks to a nutrient called choline, eating a bit of yellow can help fry health-harming belly flab and make your abs pop.


This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.


Larabar just made over their Nut & Seed line with a bold new crunchy texture and it’s perfect for those of us who love low carb snacks! Made with almonds, sprouted chia seeds (which have more bioavailable nutrients than the non-sprouted version), and only 5 more whole food ingredients, you should reach for this treat when you have a bit more room for carbs in your day as it’s made with a touch of honey and maple syrup.
Low-carb snack foods are great for people who are trying to become more physically fit, as well as those who already have strict fitness regimens, such as runners, athletes in training and people who engage in frequent workouts. In actuality, carb free snacks are good for anyone, particularly when the recipes are so flavorful that whether they are low-carb foods or low-carb brownies does not matter to the person enjoying them. These snacks are made for everyone!

Through “self-experimentation” and copious amounts of research, Mark devised the Primal Blueprint — his take on “how to thrive in the modern world armed with lessons learned about the ways our ancestors lived.” The blog is filled with personal success stories and before/after photos, along with actionable information to start living better on your own.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.
In our new documentary, Digital Editor Robert Hicks speaks to three young men who all attempted to take their own lives. Here, they talk about what they were feeling when they believed there was no way out. How #depression grabbed them and wouldn't let go. They reflect on what's happened since, how they cope and, most importantly, how they are doing better.

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.


What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.
Sometimes, the whole world of snacking seems to be based on the one thing you’re supposed to limit: refined carbs. Even the "healthier" packaged items, like granola bars, smoothies, and crackers, are full of them. If you look past the vending machine, though, you'll find plenty of other tasty options, like these smart snacks. The best part? They're as easy to toss together as they are delicious. 
What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.
Add a little excitement to the veggies in your life with my super simple hummus recipe. With only a handful of ingredients and just one step to prepare, this low-carb snack is easy to make and can be transported in a small container with no problems at all. Stick this hummus and some celery sticks in your snack pack for when you get hungry halfway through the day!
Sure, buffalo chicken wings are tasty. But what if you could have the buffalo chicken flavor combined with a crunchy celery stick in every bite? Say hello to these easy sticks. Use cooked, leftover chicken to make this speedy snack or side dish. You can cut back on the mayonnaise, too or even use a rotisserie chicken if you’re short on time. A sports game-worthy low-carb snack in just minutes? Yes, please.
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.
×