This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

When you’re on a low-carb diet, noshing on nuts is all too common—and can get old pretty quickly. To spice things up a bit—literally—get your hands on Seapoint Farms’ wasabi-infused dry-roasted edamame snack packs. Besides having a satisfyingly crunchy texture and kick of heat, they pack 11 grams of soy protein and five grams of belly-filling fiber in each 100-calorie serving!
If you happen to have a craving that it seems like you just can’t satisfy, then you should take a closer look at what that need for a specific food may be telling you. We mentioned how a craving can be a signal of a lacking nutrient or mineral in your diet and, if this craving is not satisfied by simply eating a food high in that nutrient, you may be looking at something more serious. If your yearning is something more strong than the norm, you may want to talk to your doctor. For example, if you have an unquenchable thirst, there may be an issue with your blood sugar levels that you are unaware of. This could even mean diabetes. So a simple thing like feeling thirsty all the time could be a signal of something more major.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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