One of the reasons the Atkins Diet is so effective and so pleasurable to do is that you can have a midmorning and a midafternoon snack. That way, you’ll head off fatigue, jitters, inability to concentrate, ravenous cravings for inappropriate foods or overeating at your next meal. But not just any snack will do: They should be made up of fat, protein, and fiber for best appetite control. Vegetables (and later berries and other fruit) are fine , but always eat them with some fat and/or protein to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. These snacks can be assembled in minutes and are perfectly portable. Keep the ingredients on hand at home or in your office so a satisfying and low-carb snack is always available when hunger strikes. 
However, it’s not only the cocktail snack that can contain a lot of carbs. What’s in your glass can be even worse. So what should you choose? Obviously, the most low-carb thing to drink is water: plain, sparkling, with ice or flavor. Another great alternative is low-carb ice tea. If you like drinks with alcohol once in a while, check out our low-carb alcohol guide.
It is not just us who love these recipes either. These no-carb snack ideas are loved by healthy cooking bloggers and their readers worldwide. Beyond being nutritionally sound, this collection of low-carb recipes is easy to prepare and provides convenience for those times when you need a great healthy snack in little time. Whether your craving is sweet or salty, based on your nutritional needs or just something you mentally want, you will find a perfect recipe here. Time to start cooking up some perfect sweet and salty snacks!
Vicky started Tasteaholics in 2015 with her boyfriend, Rami, hoping to document all their low carb cooking adventures. She lives in NYC and her favorite food is steak and lava cake. She enjoys photography, travel, cooking, working out, cats & Harry Potter. She loves sharing her knowledge, cooking tips and creative dishes with all of Tasteaholics’ readers.
What you’ll find: A wealth of deep-dive blog posts focusing on nutrition, weight loss, workouts, and general lifestyle for men to maintain and improve their health. The blog is the baby of Mark Sisson, a walking, talking advocate for a paleo/primal lifestyle. There’s an emphasis on choosing the right foods, types of movement, and lifestyle changes to encourage significant positive impacts on health and wellness.
The British edition of the American magazine Men's Health was launched in February 1995 with a separate editorial team, and is the best-selling monthly men's magazine in the United Kingdom,[2] selling more than GQ and Esquire put together. The magazine focuses on topics such as fitness, sex, relationships, health, weight loss, nutrition, fashion, technology and style. The currently editor-in-chief is Morgan Rees; Toby Wiseman is the featured editor.
When starting a diet, it is likely that your body will be deprived of something essential that you need. This is simply because you are changing the way that you eat and you may not have worked out all the little nuances of your diet yet. If you use to get a lot of your daily intake of fiber from fruit, for example, your new diet may not allow so much fruit. Therefore, your fiber intake will decrease and your body will be signaling you to eat more fiber in any way it can. You’d have fruit cravings not because it is delicious but because your body needs it. 

This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Sometimes, the whole world of snacking seems to be based on the one thing you’re supposed to limit: refined carbs. Even the "healthier" packaged items, like granola bars, smoothies, and crackers, are full of them. If you look past the vending machine, though, you'll find plenty of other tasty options, like these smart snacks. The best part? They're as easy to toss together as they are delicious. 

Low-carb snack foods are great for people who are trying to become more physically fit, as well as those who already have strict fitness regimens, such as runners, athletes in training and people who engage in frequent workouts. In actuality, carb free snacks are good for anyone, particularly when the recipes are so flavorful that whether they are low-carb foods or low-carb brownies does not matter to the person enjoying them. These snacks are made for everyone!

However, it’s not only the cocktail snack that can contain a lot of carbs. What’s in your glass can be even worse. So what should you choose? Obviously, the most low-carb thing to drink is water: plain, sparkling, with ice or flavor. Another great alternative is low-carb ice tea. If you like drinks with alcohol once in a while, check out our low-carb alcohol guide.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.
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