What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.

When you begin a low carb diet you may instantly be hit with a whole bunch of cravings. You want something salty, you want something sweet, you want something warm and hearty…there are so many things you body and mind may be screaming for! These cravings are perfectly natural and happen to almost everyone who has ever started a diet. The reasoning is simple, you just limited or completely cut out something that your body was used to having. Now, it is all your body wants! It needs! Whatever you focus on in your diet is going to be exactly what you crave. 

Looking for a small pre-workout nosh? This is it! The almonds in this snack pack are a good source of the amino acid L-arginine, which can help the body burn more fat and carbs during sweat sessions. The omega-3s in the walnuts also play a part in your weight loss success by boosting your brainpower, which can help you stay focused on your fitness.
Just because you’re on a low-carb diet doesn’t mean you have to go hungry. Thanks to their high water content, carrots are one of the most satiating veggies out there, making this grab-and-go snack pack a solid pick. Bonus: The carrots are accompanied by a package of seasoning that punches up the flavor, similar to dips and dressings, but without the excess calories or fat. If you’re worried about the sodium (one of the 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter), simply use half of the seasonings packet.

This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.
However, it’s not only the cocktail snack that can contain a lot of carbs. What’s in your glass can be even worse. So what should you choose? Obviously, the most low-carb thing to drink is water: plain, sparkling, with ice or flavor. Another great alternative is low-carb ice tea. If you like drinks with alcohol once in a while, check out our low-carb alcohol guide.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look.
This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.
When starting a diet, it is likely that your body will be deprived of something essential that you need. This is simply because you are changing the way that you eat and you may not have worked out all the little nuances of your diet yet. If you use to get a lot of your daily intake of fiber from fruit, for example, your new diet may not allow so much fruit. Therefore, your fiber intake will decrease and your body will be signaling you to eat more fiber in any way it can. You’d have fruit cravings not because it is delicious but because your body needs it.

The main idea of starting a diet is to eat healthier (this is true for low carb diets and just about any other diet across the board). While many people will be able to go about their diet as planned with no complications, occasionally your body will react in an unexpected way. Alerting your doctor and working with them in order to diet in the safest, healthiest way possible is essential. By looping your doctor in on your diet you will be doing yourself a huge favor. Medical professionals will be able to offer your tips and tricks that will help you on your diet path and they will also be hyper-aware of you as a patient. This is ideal as your doctor can then monitor your progress as well as any health changes while on the diet. Yes, diets are about eliminating foods but they are also about maintaining and improving your health, Having a doctor by your side will encourage this basis of diets.
Skyr, Icelandic yogurt that’s similar to strained Greek yogurt, is one of the lowest sugar yogurts on the market. Pick up Siggi’s No Added Sugar Whole Fat Yogurt with Peach & Mango for a touch of sweetness without breaking the carb bank. (You’ll also reap 10 grams of protein and belly-filling healthy fats.) Like your yogurt plain or like to choose your own fruits? Go with Chobani’s Whole Milk Greek Yogurt—130 calories, 6 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 55 mg sodium, 6 g carbs (0 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 13 g protein per 5.3 oz container.

The British edition of the American magazine Men's Health was launched in February 1995 with a separate editorial team, and is the best-selling monthly men's magazine in the United Kingdom,[2] selling more than GQ and Esquire put together. The magazine focuses on topics such as fitness, sex, relationships, health, weight loss, nutrition, fashion, technology and style. The currently editor-in-chief is Morgan Rees; Toby Wiseman is the featured editor.


What you’ll find: Blog articles and more extensive reports on general health, sexual health, emotional wellness, nutrition, and fitness aimed for the specific needs of teen and young adult males. The tone is frank and nonjudgmental and users are prompted to submit queries: “Do you have a health question that you’re too embarrassed to ask? Submit your question here!”
What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about. 

What you’ll find: A wealth of deep-dive blog posts focusing on nutrition, weight loss, workouts, and general lifestyle for men to maintain and improve their health. The blog is the baby of Mark Sisson, a walking, talking advocate for a paleo/primal lifestyle. There’s an emphasis on choosing the right foods, types of movement, and lifestyle changes to encourage significant positive impacts on health and wellness.
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