This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.
Another thing to mention is that when you start eating low carb, your liver no longer holds on to excess sodium as it use to. Instead, it flushes the sodium out frequently. If you have a high carb diet, this encourages your liver to retain salt but when you have a lower carb intake, your body naturally excretes the salt. This is called the “natriuresis of fasting’ and is something that hunter-gatherer cultures have seemed to evolve to compensate for. These cultures where processed foods are nonexistent and diets are naturally low in carbs have a high sodium intake. You should take a page from the books of these ancient cultures and abide by your bodies need for salt!
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version. 

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
Through “self-experimentation” and copious amounts of research, Mark devised the Primal Blueprint — his take on “how to thrive in the modern world armed with lessons learned about the ways our ancestors lived.” The blog is filled with personal success stories and before/after photos, along with actionable information to start living better on your own.

Skyr, Icelandic yogurt that’s similar to strained Greek yogurt, is one of the lowest sugar yogurts on the market. Pick up Siggi’s No Added Sugar Whole Fat Yogurt with Peach & Mango for a touch of sweetness without breaking the carb bank. (You’ll also reap 10 grams of protein and belly-filling healthy fats.) Like your yogurt plain or like to choose your own fruits? Go with Chobani’s Whole Milk Greek Yogurt—130 calories, 6 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 55 mg sodium, 6 g carbs (0 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 13 g protein per 5.3 oz container.
When starting a diet, it is likely that your body will be deprived of something essential that you need. This is simply because you are changing the way that you eat and you may not have worked out all the little nuances of your diet yet. If you use to get a lot of your daily intake of fiber from fruit, for example, your new diet may not allow so much fruit. Therefore, your fiber intake will decrease and your body will be signaling you to eat more fiber in any way it can. You’d have fruit cravings not because it is delicious but because your body needs it.
What you’ll find: Expert insights, exercises, and advice for handling anger, stress, and health issues — including ‘male menopause’ — in a productive, nontoxic way. The site is especially good for helping men transition away from less healthy approaches to well-being. It does a good job of filtering the dirty bathwater without throwing away the masculinity baby.

Add a little excitement to the veggies in your life with my super simple hummus recipe. With only a handful of ingredients and just one step to prepare, this low-carb snack is easy to make and can be transported in a small container with no problems at all. Stick this hummus and some celery sticks in your snack pack for when you get hungry halfway through the day!
These grain-free pizza bites are made with a mixture of almond and coconut flours. They’re easy to customize with your favorite seasonings, though I love the suggested garlic, thyme, oregano and basil suggestion. I’d swap the pepperoni for turkey pepperoni or even add some of the optional ingredients, like mushrooms, bell peppers or olives. This is one adults and kids alike will love.
Through “self-experimentation” and copious amounts of research, Mark devised the Primal Blueprint — his take on “how to thrive in the modern world armed with lessons learned about the ways our ancestors lived.” The blog is filled with personal success stories and before/after photos, along with actionable information to start living better on your own. 
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