When you’re on a low-carb diet, noshing on nuts is all too common—and can get old pretty quickly. To spice things up a bit—literally—get your hands on Seapoint Farms’ wasabi-infused dry-roasted edamame snack packs. Besides having a satisfyingly crunchy texture and kick of heat, they pack 11 grams of soy protein and five grams of belly-filling fiber in each 100-calorie serving!
Larabar just made over their Nut & Seed line with a bold new crunchy texture and it’s perfect for those of us who love low carb snacks! Made with almonds, sprouted chia seeds (which have more bioavailable nutrients than the non-sprouted version), and only 5 more whole food ingredients, you should reach for this treat when you have a bit more room for carbs in your day as it’s made with a touch of honey and maple syrup.
Your Paleo Scotch eggs and stuffed avocado look awesome- thank you! I pretty much start out every day with a handful of nuts. I learned this habit from Tim Ferriss in The Four Hour Body. In ‘The End of Overeating’, David Kessler recommends snacking between meals as a strategy for not overeating at mealtimes. Don’t quote me, but I think he suggests 200 to 300 calories snacks and 500-600 calorie meals. I recommend both books.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Skyr, Icelandic yogurt that’s similar to strained Greek yogurt, is one of the lowest sugar yogurts on the market. Pick up Siggi’s No Added Sugar Whole Fat Yogurt with Peach & Mango for a touch of sweetness without breaking the carb bank. (You’ll also reap 10 grams of protein and belly-filling healthy fats.) Like your yogurt plain or like to choose your own fruits? Go with Chobani’s Whole Milk Greek Yogurt—130 calories, 6 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 55 mg sodium, 6 g carbs (0 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 13 g protein per 5.3 oz container.
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
Hi Bonnie. Yeah, added sugar in lunch meat is something to watch out for sure, great point. I have been able to find some here and there with no added sugar at all. Many times I’ve seen when it does contain sugar it is only 1-2 grams. So 6 slices for example might just be one gram of carbs. It really depends on how strict you are eating keto. Some people would completely avoid it because the sugar is technically not keto, other people might just look at it with a carb standpoint only. Very important to look out for though, especially for labels that say “sweet”, “honey”. etc. I typically avoid those ones all together.

Larabar just made over their Nut & Seed line with a bold new crunchy texture and it’s perfect for those of us who love low carb snacks! Made with almonds, sprouted chia seeds (which have more bioavailable nutrients than the non-sprouted version), and only 5 more whole food ingredients, you should reach for this treat when you have a bit more room for carbs in your day as it’s made with a touch of honey and maple syrup.
The main idea of starting a diet is to eat healthier (this is true for low carb diets and just about any other diet across the board). While many people will be able to go about their diet as planned with no complications, occasionally your body will react in an unexpected way. Alerting your doctor and working with them in order to diet in the safest, healthiest way possible is essential. By looping your doctor in on your diet you will be doing yourself a huge favor. Medical professionals will be able to offer your tips and tricks that will help you on your diet path and they will also be hyper-aware of you as a patient. This is ideal as your doctor can then monitor your progress as well as any health changes while on the diet. Yes, diets are about eliminating foods but they are also about maintaining and improving your health, Having a doctor by your side will encourage this basis of diets.
Your Paleo Scotch eggs and stuffed avocado look awesome- thank you! I pretty much start out every day with a handful of nuts. I learned this habit from Tim Ferriss in The Four Hour Body. In ‘The End of Overeating’, David Kessler recommends snacking between meals as a strategy for not overeating at mealtimes. Don’t quote me, but I think he suggests 200 to 300 calories snacks and 500-600 calorie meals. I recommend both books.
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