The main idea of starting a diet is to eat healthier (this is true for low carb diets and just about any other diet across the board). While many people will be able to go about their diet as planned with no complications, occasionally your body will react in an unexpected way. Alerting your doctor and working with them in order to diet in the safest, healthiest way possible is essential. By looping your doctor in on your diet you will be doing yourself a huge favor. Medical professionals will be able to offer your tips and tricks that will help you on your diet path and they will also be hyper-aware of you as a patient. This is ideal as your doctor can then monitor your progress as well as any health changes while on the diet. Yes, diets are about eliminating foods but they are also about maintaining and improving your health, Having a doctor by your side will encourage this basis of diets.

Sure, buffalo chicken wings are tasty. But what if you could have the buffalo chicken flavor combined with a crunchy celery stick in every bite? Say hello to these easy sticks. Use cooked, leftover chicken to make this speedy snack or side dish. You can cut back on the mayonnaise, too or even use a rotisserie chicken if you’re short on time. A sports game-worthy low-carb snack in just minutes? Yes, please.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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