In 1999, Men's Health sponsored a British UCI Division 3 professional cycle racing team. The Director Sportif was Sid Barras, a former professional cyclist. Although the team achieved numerous successes during the year, sponsorship was not renewed in 2000. Team members included Welshmen Matt Beckett and Huw Pritchard, a medal-winning Commonwealth Games competitor.
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look.
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look.

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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