This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.

What you’ll find: Blog articles and more extensive reports on general health, sexual health, emotional wellness, nutrition, and fitness aimed for the specific needs of teen and young adult males. The tone is frank and nonjudgmental and users are prompted to submit queries: “Do you have a health question that you’re too embarrassed to ask? Submit your question here!”
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
Hi Bonnie. Yeah, added sugar in lunch meat is something to watch out for sure, great point. I have been able to find some here and there with no added sugar at all. Many times I’ve seen when it does contain sugar it is only 1-2 grams. So 6 slices for example might just be one gram of carbs. It really depends on how strict you are eating keto. Some people would completely avoid it because the sugar is technically not keto, other people might just look at it with a carb standpoint only. Very important to look out for though, especially for labels that say “sweet”, “honey”. etc. I typically avoid those ones all together.
Another thing to mention is that when you start eating low carb, your liver no longer holds on to excess sodium as it use to. Instead, it flushes the sodium out frequently. If you have a high carb diet, this encourages your liver to retain salt but when you have a lower carb intake, your body naturally excretes the salt. This is called the “natriuresis of fasting’ and is something that hunter-gatherer cultures have seemed to evolve to compensate for. These cultures where processed foods are nonexistent and diets are naturally low in carbs have a high sodium intake. You should take a page from the books of these ancient cultures and abide by your bodies need for salt!
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look.

When you’re considering going on a low-carb diet or simply reducing carbohydrates, full meals are a little easier to plan — eating all the meat and veggies is always a good option! But it’s nice to chow down on something a little lighter than a steak or full keto chicken meal when it’s snack time. Unfortunately, the traditional snacks you’d reach for don’t normally fall into the category of low-carb snacks.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.

What you’ll find: A wealth of deep-dive blog posts focusing on nutrition, weight loss, workouts, and general lifestyle for men to maintain and improve their health. The blog is the baby of Mark Sisson, a walking, talking advocate for a paleo/primal lifestyle. There’s an emphasis on choosing the right foods, types of movement, and lifestyle changes to encourage significant positive impacts on health and wellness.
Just as with a salt craving, a sugar craving is one that won’t go away unless it is satisfied. If you try to ignore your desire for something sweet then the pressure to eat sweet foods will only grown stronger. It is not a bad thing to “give in” to cravings and, in fact, it can be unhealthy not to. If you keep avoiding sweets then you will keep thinking about sweets and wanting them badly. However, even if you wanted to just have a small something sweet to help you through the say, what would you be able to eat on a low carb diet?
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
Through “self-experimentation” and copious amounts of research, Mark devised the Primal Blueprint — his take on “how to thrive in the modern world armed with lessons learned about the ways our ancestors lived.” The blog is filled with personal success stories and before/after photos, along with actionable information to start living better on your own.
×