Sometimes, the whole world of snacking seems to be based on the one thing you’re supposed to limit: refined carbs. Even the "healthier" packaged items, like granola bars, smoothies, and crackers, are full of them. If you look past the vending machine, though, you'll find plenty of other tasty options, like these smart snacks. The best part? They're as easy to toss together as they are delicious. 
Your Paleo Scotch eggs and stuffed avocado look awesome- thank you! I pretty much start out every day with a handful of nuts. I learned this habit from Tim Ferriss in The Four Hour Body. In ‘The End of Overeating’, David Kessler recommends snacking between meals as a strategy for not overeating at mealtimes. Don’t quote me, but I think he suggests 200 to 300 calories snacks and 500-600 calorie meals. I recommend both books.
There is another craving that you may find yourself getting frequently when on a low carb diet and that is for something sweet. This may seem like something you would expect as cutting carbs essentially means cutting sweets. Sugar has been considered to be an addictive substance that is hard to step away from. In fact, the effects of sugar on the body are similar to the effects of Class A drugs. So, as with any addiction, if you try to stop it, you will feel the effects.
Tater tots are the perfect snack: portable, easy to eat and super tasty. They’re especially loved in the toddler and school-aged crowd. But have you seen what’s in those ingredient lists? Luckily, you can make your own low-carb snack version, thanks to this cauliflower recipe. With only five ingredients that are baked instead of fried, you won’t believe how much better this version tastes.

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The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version. 
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