It is not just us who love these recipes either. These no-carb snack ideas are loved by healthy cooking bloggers and their readers worldwide. Beyond being nutritionally sound, this collection of low-carb recipes is easy to prepare and provides convenience for those times when you need a great healthy snack in little time. Whether your craving is sweet or salty, based on your nutritional needs or just something you mentally want, you will find a perfect recipe here. Time to start cooking up some perfect sweet and salty snacks!
Vicky started Tasteaholics in 2015 with her boyfriend, Rami, hoping to document all their low carb cooking adventures. She lives in NYC and her favorite food is steak and lava cake. She enjoys photography, travel, cooking, working out, cats & Harry Potter. She loves sharing her knowledge, cooking tips and creative dishes with all of Tasteaholics’ readers.
Even kale haters come around when they taste kale chips. Some store-bought varieties have less than 10 grams of carbs. You can cut that number even further by making them at home. Tear the leaves from a bunch of kale. Rinse and dry them. Toss with 1 tablespoon of oil and 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Roast them in your oven at 300 degrees for 20-25 minutes, until the kale is crispy.

When you’re considering going on a low-carb diet or simply reducing carbohydrates, full meals are a little easier to plan — eating all the meat and veggies is always a good option! But it’s nice to chow down on something a little lighter than a steak or full keto chicken meal when it’s snack time. Unfortunately, the traditional snacks you’d reach for don’t normally fall into the category of low-carb snacks.
When you begin a low carb diet you may instantly be hit with a whole bunch of cravings. You want something salty, you want something sweet, you want something warm and hearty…there are so many things you body and mind may be screaming for! These cravings are perfectly natural and happen to almost everyone who has ever started a diet. The reasoning is simple, you just limited or completely cut out something that your body was used to having. Now, it is all your body wants! It needs! Whatever you focus on in your diet is going to be exactly what you crave.

The UK version has maintained the image of the original US version, in particular by promoting the body care, nutrition and all matters relating to the male universe. The concept of aesthetically-perfect man is an extreme with the presence on the cover of bare-chested muscular male models.[citation needed] Because of this, the magazine has often been criticized for promoting an unattainable model of man. To strengthen the idea of achievability, the staff of the magazine often try out the health and fitness programmes themselves and write about their experiences alongside pictorial evidence. In March 2006, one of the UK writers, Dan Rookwood, appeared on the cover having transformed his body shape while working at the magazine. The staff of German Men's Health have also appeared on their cover,[citation needed] and UK fitness editor Ray Klerck has appeared on the cover and within the pages of the magazine as a model.
Skyr, Icelandic yogurt that’s similar to strained Greek yogurt, is one of the lowest sugar yogurts on the market. Pick up Siggi’s No Added Sugar Whole Fat Yogurt with Peach & Mango for a touch of sweetness without breaking the carb bank. (You’ll also reap 10 grams of protein and belly-filling healthy fats.) Like your yogurt plain or like to choose your own fruits? Go with Chobani’s Whole Milk Greek Yogurt—130 calories, 6 g fat (4 g saturated fat), 55 mg sodium, 6 g carbs (0 g fiber, 4 g sugar), 13 g protein per 5.3 oz container.
Vicky started Tasteaholics in 2015 with her boyfriend, Rami, hoping to document all their low carb cooking adventures. She lives in NYC and her favorite food is steak and lava cake. She enjoys photography, travel, cooking, working out, cats & Harry Potter. She loves sharing her knowledge, cooking tips and creative dishes with all of Tasteaholics’ readers.
When starting a diet, it is likely that your body will be deprived of something essential that you need. This is simply because you are changing the way that you eat and you may not have worked out all the little nuances of your diet yet. If you use to get a lot of your daily intake of fiber from fruit, for example, your new diet may not allow so much fruit. Therefore, your fiber intake will decrease and your body will be signaling you to eat more fiber in any way it can. You’d have fruit cravings not because it is delicious but because your body needs it.
Hi Bonnie. Yeah, added sugar in lunch meat is something to watch out for sure, great point. I have been able to find some here and there with no added sugar at all. Many times I’ve seen when it does contain sugar it is only 1-2 grams. So 6 slices for example might just be one gram of carbs. It really depends on how strict you are eating keto. Some people would completely avoid it because the sugar is technically not keto, other people might just look at it with a carb standpoint only. Very important to look out for though, especially for labels that say “sweet”, “honey”. etc. I typically avoid those ones all together. 

Hi Bonnie. Yeah, added sugar in lunch meat is something to watch out for sure, great point. I have been able to find some here and there with no added sugar at all. Many times I’ve seen when it does contain sugar it is only 1-2 grams. So 6 slices for example might just be one gram of carbs. It really depends on how strict you are eating keto. Some people would completely avoid it because the sugar is technically not keto, other people might just look at it with a carb standpoint only. Very important to look out for though, especially for labels that say “sweet”, “honey”. etc. I typically avoid those ones all together.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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