What you’ll find: A wealth of deep-dive blog posts focusing on nutrition, weight loss, workouts, and general lifestyle for men to maintain and improve their health. The blog is the baby of Mark Sisson, a walking, talking advocate for a paleo/primal lifestyle. There’s an emphasis on choosing the right foods, types of movement, and lifestyle changes to encourage significant positive impacts on health and wellness.

Add a little excitement to the veggies in your life with my super simple hummus recipe. With only a handful of ingredients and just one step to prepare, this low-carb snack is easy to make and can be transported in a small container with no problems at all. Stick this hummus and some celery sticks in your snack pack for when you get hungry halfway through the day!


To begin, a craving can be your body’s way of telling you what nutrients it is lacking. If you are craving salty foods, that may be a signal that your body is low in sodium and it needs to be replenished. Many people have a tendency to think that ignoring a craving is what you should do and that cravings are bad but that is just not the case. Sure, many of us may crave a bag of potato chips just because it tastes good and we want to eat it but when you start a diet, these cravings turn away from basic human wants to essential human needs.
The cover always has bare-chested muscular American male models and personal trainers like Tom Cortesi, Scott King, Jack Guy, Jim Buol, Gregg Avedon, Russell Brown, Owen McKibbin, Rick Dietz, Timothy Adams, Bradly Tomberlin and Rick Arango.[citation needed] In 2002, the UK edition started what became a yearly competition to find a reader with a body fit to front the magazine in the hopes that the image of a British "normal guy" would spur other readers to obtain the 'look' and remind them that this kind of physique is obtainable.[3]

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.

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