We all know fat is more filling than carbs, but every now and then you get a hankering for something to snack on and you NEED some low carb snacks. Whether it’s salty, sweet or frosty, we all need a moment to enjoy something in between meals. Being on a diet shouldn’t mean all snacks are thrown out the window, being on a diet means learning what your body needs and how to best provide for it. If your body is craving something salty, there are ways of indulging without setting yourself back. There are ways of eating even brownies and cakes that won’t undo all your progress.


Just because you’re on a low-carb diet doesn’t mean you have to go hungry. Thanks to their high water content, carrots are one of the most satiating veggies out there, making this grab-and-go snack pack a solid pick. Bonus: The carrots are accompanied by a package of seasoning that punches up the flavor, similar to dips and dressings, but without the excess calories or fat. If you’re worried about the sodium (one of the 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter), simply use half of the seasonings packet.
Tips for Success: Read your labels. Watch out for hidden carbs; to calculate the grams of carbs that impact your blood sugar, subtract the number of grams of dietary fiber from the total number of carb grams. Also double-check serving sizes on labels; some foods and drinks are actually two or more servings, so you need to add in those extra carbs and calories.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
What you’ll find: Blog articles and more extensive reports on general health, sexual health, emotional wellness, nutrition, and fitness aimed for the specific needs of teen and young adult males. The tone is frank and nonjudgmental and users are prompted to submit queries: “Do you have a health question that you’re too embarrassed to ask? Submit your question here!”

The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version. 
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