The first winner of the UK Cover Model search was 22-year-old Graeme Peacock,[4] who secured a sponsorship contract with supplement manufacturer Maximuscle. There was no contest in 2003, and in 2004 the contest went annual, with the second winner being Neil Laverty, now represented by Compton Model Agency. Winners for 2005 were Ollie Foster (United Kingdom) and Manuel Mera (Spain). In 2006, 21-year-old Mike Fawkes won the competition, in 2007 Chris Whitlow, in 2008 Kevin Goodwin, in 2009 29-year-old James Bayntun,[5] in 2010 Kirk Miller.[citation needed] Celebrities such as Jason Statham, Rusty Joiner, Ryan Reynolds, Josh Holloway, Marco Dapper, Gerard Butler, Vin Diesel, Joe Manganiello and Cristiano Ronaldo have appeared on the cover].[citation needed]
What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.
Knowing exactly what you should — and shouldn’t — be doing for your own health isn’t always easy. There’s too much information, not enough time in the day, and a lot of advice that may not suit your lifestyle. Finding what works best for you — when it comes to fitness, food, nutrition, stress management, sex, aging, gut health, brain health — is much easier when you know where to look. 

There is another craving that you may find yourself getting frequently when on a low carb diet and that is for something sweet. This may seem like something you would expect as cutting carbs essentially means cutting sweets. Sugar has been considered to be an addictive substance that is hard to step away from. In fact, the effects of sugar on the body are similar to the effects of Class A drugs. So, as with any addiction, if you try to stop it, you will feel the effects.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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