Another thing to mention is that when you start eating low carb, your liver no longer holds on to excess sodium as it use to. Instead, it flushes the sodium out frequently. If you have a high carb diet, this encourages your liver to retain salt but when you have a lower carb intake, your body naturally excretes the salt. This is called the “natriuresis of fasting’ and is something that hunter-gatherer cultures have seemed to evolve to compensate for. These cultures where processed foods are nonexistent and diets are naturally low in carbs have a high sodium intake. You should take a page from the books of these ancient cultures and abide by your bodies need for salt!
Larabar just made over their Nut & Seed line with a bold new crunchy texture and it’s perfect for those of us who love low carb snacks! Made with almonds, sprouted chia seeds (which have more bioavailable nutrients than the non-sprouted version), and only 5 more whole food ingredients, you should reach for this treat when you have a bit more room for carbs in your day as it’s made with a touch of honey and maple syrup. 

For many friends, relatives and partners of those how have taken their own life, suicide is a question of why. Yet they will never get to hear the answer. We all have a mate, a colleague, a brother, a partner, a nephew, a father – a man in our lives who could be struggling. We need to get more men talking. These three guys are here to start the conversation.
The British edition of the American magazine Men's Health was launched in February 1995 with a separate editorial team, and is the best-selling monthly men's magazine in the United Kingdom,[2] selling more than GQ and Esquire put together. The magazine focuses on topics such as fitness, sex, relationships, health, weight loss, nutrition, fashion, technology and style. The currently editor-in-chief is Morgan Rees; Toby Wiseman is the featured editor.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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