How many times have you bought eggs, fully intending to boil them for the week ahead–and then just totally forgot? We know we’re guilty of this. These natural eggs are cooked, peeled and ready to eat whenever hunger strikes. Oh, and while you’re munching away, don’t discard the yolk. Thanks to a nutrient called choline, eating a bit of yellow can help fry health-harming belly flab and make your abs pop.

Just because you’re on a low-carb diet doesn’t mean you have to go hungry. Thanks to their high water content, carrots are one of the most satiating veggies out there, making this grab-and-go snack pack a solid pick. Bonus: The carrots are accompanied by a package of seasoning that punches up the flavor, similar to dips and dressings, but without the excess calories or fat. If you’re worried about the sodium (one of the 50 Little Things Making You Fatter and Fatter), simply use half of the seasonings packet.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
We all know fat is more filling than carbs, but every now and then you get a hankering for something to snack on and you NEED some low carb snacks. Whether it’s salty, sweet or frosty, we all need a moment to enjoy something in between meals. Being on a diet shouldn’t mean all snacks are thrown out the window, being on a diet means learning what your body needs and how to best provide for it. If your body is craving something salty, there are ways of indulging without setting yourself back. There are ways of eating even brownies and cakes that won’t undo all your progress.
What you’ll find: A wealth of deep-dive blog posts focusing on nutrition, weight loss, workouts, and general lifestyle for men to maintain and improve their health. The blog is the baby of Mark Sisson, a walking, talking advocate for a paleo/primal lifestyle. There’s an emphasis on choosing the right foods, types of movement, and lifestyle changes to encourage significant positive impacts on health and wellness.
Through “self-experimentation” and copious amounts of research, Mark devised the Primal Blueprint — his take on “how to thrive in the modern world armed with lessons learned about the ways our ancestors lived.” The blog is filled with personal success stories and before/after photos, along with actionable information to start living better on your own.
What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.
Another thing to mention is that when you start eating low carb, your liver no longer holds on to excess sodium as it use to. Instead, it flushes the sodium out frequently. If you have a high carb diet, this encourages your liver to retain salt but when you have a lower carb intake, your body naturally excretes the salt. This is called the “natriuresis of fasting’ and is something that hunter-gatherer cultures have seemed to evolve to compensate for. These cultures where processed foods are nonexistent and diets are naturally low in carbs have a high sodium intake. You should take a page from the books of these ancient cultures and abide by your bodies need for salt!
What you’ll find: This is the online component of the ubiquitous Men’s Health magazine. It addresses issues such as sports, sexuality, supplements, and testicular cancer. You’ll find informational articles with strong introductions to these and many other topics. It’s an excellent starting point for anything you’ve been wondering or worrying about.

If you are getting a craving that you think may be a sign that you need certain foods in your diet, add them with caution. If you think you need salty foods or more sodium, make sure you eat them but within the guidelines of your diet. If you are eating low carb, then eat salty, low carb foods. This way, your body gets what it needs and you get to stick to your diet!


When you’re on a low-carb diet, noshing on nuts is all too common—and can get old pretty quickly. To spice things up a bit—literally—get your hands on Seapoint Farms’ wasabi-infused dry-roasted edamame snack packs. Besides having a satisfyingly crunchy texture and kick of heat, they pack 11 grams of soy protein and five grams of belly-filling fiber in each 100-calorie serving!
This low-carb, high-protein snack bar is made from hormone-free chicken, organic spices and chia seeds —and is much lower in sodium than a typical meat stick, too. You won’t find any actual sriracha in this bar, despite the name. Instead, it gets its heat from the addition of red pepper flakes, which Laval University researchers say can diminish hunger and amp up the calorie burn.
What you’ll find: Expert insights, exercises, and advice for handling anger, stress, and health issues — including ‘male menopause’ — in a productive, nontoxic way. The site is especially good for helping men transition away from less healthy approaches to well-being. It does a good job of filtering the dirty bathwater without throwing away the masculinity baby.
The content of the U.S. version in the year 2000 was analysed in Stibbe (2004).[6] The findings suggested that Men's Health gave some useful health advice but included images of masculinity that were counter-productive for health promotion. In particular, the form of hegemonic masculinity promoted by the magazine had the potential to promote negative health behaviours such as excess alcohol consumption, excess meat consumption, reliance on convenience food, unsafe sex, and aggressive behavior.[6] The scope of this study did not include how the content of the magazine has changed over time, or how the content of the UK version differs from the U.S. version.
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